Daniel Immerwahr

Daniel Immerwahr

Associate Professor
Department of History
Northwestern University
225 Harris Hall
1881 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
847-491-7418

cv  | bio

Email: daniel.immerwahr at
northwestern.edu









Academic Bio (short version):

I am a historian of the United States and the world, serving in the history department at Northwestern University. My first book, Thinking Small (Harvard, 2015), offers a critical account of the United States' pursuit of grassroots development at home and abroad in the middle of the twentieth century. I'm writing another book, How to Hide an Empire, about the United States' overseas territory.

Academic Bio (long version):
I got my undergraduate degree from Columbia University, where I studied history and philosophy. Then, funded by a Marshall scholarship, I got a second BA, this time at King's College at Cambridge University. My mentor there was the historian of empire, C. A. Bayly, though I wrote my thesis on African architecture under the supervision of John Lonsdale. I returned to the United States to get a doctoral degree in history at the University of California, Berkeley, studying under the intellectual historian David Hollinger. My dissertation won the Allan Nevins Prize in American Economic History from the Economic History Association, and it received honorable mention for the Betty M. Unterberger Prize from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations.

In 2011-12, I was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University's Committee on Global Thought. In fall 2012, I joined Northwestern University's history department.

My first book, Thinking Small (Harvard, 2015), offers a critical account of the United States' pursuit of grassroots development at home and abroad in the middle of the twentieth century. It won the Merle Curti Prize in Intellectual History from the Organization of American Historians and was the co-winner of the Annual Book Prize from the Society for U.S. Intellectual History. Also, in 2015 I received the Stuart L. Bernath Lecture Prize from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, given every year to a younger scholar for "excellence in teaching and research in the field of foreign relations."

My second book, How to Hide an Empire (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, forthcoming) is about the United States' territorial empire: colonies, occupation zones, and military bases. I've received two year-long fellowships to complete it. One, from the National Endowment for the Humanities, funded a year of research at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California. Another, the Andrew Carnegie Fellowship, will fund the completion of the book.

My work has appeared in Diplomatic History, Modern Intellectual History, the Journal of the History of Ideas, the Journal of African Cultural Studies, Modern American History, Jacobin, n+1, and Dissent, among other venues.

My CV is here.